• Annika Eriksson’s work Shelter has been realized in two parts across the chapters of the show. There is on the one hand an urban outline of form in this part sculpture, part print – the sheer dimension, self-illumination and billboard-like quality evoke the public sphere. On the other, there is an intimacy, idiosyncrasy and uncanny quality to the imagery. Much like Winnicott’s notion of the holding environment as a relational threshold between the developmental and the systemic, so is Shelter exploring and transmitting a similar gaze and logic of thought:

    It involves a kind of person who is at the mercy of the developing world, who can’t quite figure out how to manage. This world now is made for might and ownership. I think you recognise in childhood the strategies that are necessary for being alone or adapting to surroundings, whatever they are. One example being how you go through school, from elementary, to middle, to high, to college, to a job, and you have to be somehow able to figure all that out, the timing and what you have to do to get to the next step. All this takes an understanding of the world based on ancient customs of domination and territory. There are people wandering around who don’t get it, and that includes many who are very intelligent.  (interview, Fanny Howe).

    Print, metal, neon, 450 cm x 350 cm, 2021. Commission for The Holding Environment, Bonner Kunstverein.

  • Shelter 2
  • Shelter 2
  • Shelter 2